Group 5B: Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Immunology; Novel Targets & Treatments



Thursday, Dec 15
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm Eastern Time (US/New York)



Poster #P6-10-03

Datopotamab Deruxtecan (Dato-DXd) in advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC): Updated results from the Phase 1 TROPION-PanTumor01 Study

Poster #P1-04-04:

A multiomic approach to the identification of immune signatures of anti-PD1/PDL1 therapy responders in metastatic triple negative breast cancer: new implications in the role of helper T-cell and B-cell interplay

Poster author Avia Wilkerson, M.D. will attend this session

Mentor: Debbie Denardi

Debbie has been screened for breast cancer every 6 months since she was 27 years old due to her family history of breast cancer. Her mother and 3 of her sisters died after a breast cancer diagnosis in the ‘70s. They were all very young (40-45 years old). This family history was reported to every doctor she visited, but no doctor or nurse advised her to get tested for hereditary cancer. Finally, in 2010 when she was 48 years old and after 4 months of a clean mammogram and ultrasound, she was diagnosed with TNBC and a BRCA1 mutation.

Since her diagnosis and lack of education about hereditary cancers, she has been learning as much as she can to educate individuals and families about hereditary cancer. She started her volunteer work with FORCE (Facing Hereditary Cancer Empowered) and has served as a peer support leader in S. Florida since 2012. She also serves as the Treasurer for FORCE’s Board. During the first few years of her advocacy, she attended conferences and continued her local support. In 2018, she had the opportunity to start a new phase of her career and education in advocacy.

Twitter: @debsetu

Scientist: Vinton Cheng, M.D., Ph.D.

Vinton Cheng is an academic clinical lecturer at the University of Leeds and St James’s University Hospital, UK. He completed his DPhil at the University of Oxford, where he studied a molecularly targeted MRI contrast agent that was shown to improve detection of brain metastasis. Vinton enjoys working at the interface of different research disciplines and most recently spent a year working in the Focused Ultrasound group at the University of Virginia investigating how to enhance the immune response against brain metastasis. He is passionate about communicating science and collaborating with patients in the clinic to improve cancer care.